The Shoe Snob Blog

March 23, 2012

Written by , Posted in News

Balmoral Boot Porn

I was never quite the biggest fan of pairing black with a burgundy and/or an oxblood/merlot type of color, but I must admit that the more that I studied this prototype of mine (for wear-testing), the more that the combination of colors grew on me. Having friends and colleagues try it on, wearing jeans, suits, dress casual trousers etc., the more that I felt that these colors actually go quite nice together. It never presented itself as being too dressy for one thing, yet too casual for another. Meaning, that when my colleague tried it on with his navy suit, I felt that it complemented the outfit quite well and when tried on underneath a pair of jeans, it happened to smarten up the outfit. That being, while it’s contrast is subtle and not in the least ostentatious, it still provides a great deal of pleasure to the eye, overcoming the monotony of two colors too close in tone. I am still not sure if this will be a colorway that I offer for my first collection, but nevertheless, I am now pleased to have at least had it made up, which gave me the chance to absorb its subtle yet elegant contrast….

  • Anonymous

    It’s a lovely design but I’m not crazy about the overlapping leather at the vamp (not sure if it’s the correct term). Have you considered (again another possibly incorrect term) Hungarian sides as seen on the St. Crispin boot and certain Vass models (and I’m sure a hundred others)?

  • Anon – Glad that you like the design, but I have no idea what you are referring to when you talk about overlapping leather and then mention the other things. Are you talking about it being ‘closed lacing’ otherwise known as an oxford boot, whereas some makers create ‘open lacing’ boots otherwise referred to as derby style?? Can you send a picture of what you are referring to?

    -Justin

  • Anonymous

    Sure thing! I’m talking about where, on each side, the front bit overlaps the back bit (hope I’m not being too technical here, in contrast to the following:

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/data.tumblr.com/tumblr_lsq6geZ8oq1r00ztro1_500.jpg

    also this one from your site:

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_tc2OkhJhc-Y/TA7E3TG9Z3I/AAAAAAAAApo/kZk02FrADvk/s1600/g_g-wigmore-rioja-logod_1_large.jpg

    also:

    http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRTofY4Xo9WpOvlxNwhEmAVGMpvnzqnaVeShHjDHfTwA-h4wsRw-sTRej_0

    PS. Long-time lurker, first time poster, great fan of your site!

  • Oscar

    I love these kinds of boots but is it just me or are there NO pictures on the internet of balmoral boots that are actually worn?

    I only see pairs without creasing of any kind when I browse blogs and SF.

  • Anon – Ah okay, I see what you are saying now…well, that’s just the way that i designed it…Did not want to be like others I guess. I have designed oxfords like that, but my balmoral boot will stick to this design…thanks for the input though and for your first post! Glad that you enjoy the blog…

    Oscar – that’s funny. Probably because people just like to take the pictures when they are brand new, you know? Shoes almost always look best straight out of the box…

    But just to break the spell, here is a picture of me wearing my balmoral boots by G&G:

    http://the-shoe-snob.blogspot.co.uk/2011/11/what-i-am-wearing.html

    -Justin

  • Anonymous

    Absolutely! You have to follow your vision.

    Is there a name, though, for the styling that I’m talking about?

  • Anon – There is no real term for it. You had it right when you said the overlapping leather, I was just a bit confused when you said vamp, as that is usually the area right below the laces, heading towards to the toe box. That area would be the quarter connecting to the heel counter, but the quarter is not clearly defined in this shoe as it is directly attached to the vamp, without any separating pieces or stitching. Confusing stuff huh!

    -Justin